Is Wheat Causing Your Belly Fat?

Wheat today is not what it used to be.    Today it is more of a hybrid wheat  of 19th century and earlier  versions  that our ancestors  relied on for their daily bread. The same can be said about some other grains.

Today’s wheat product is a genetic modification of horticultural or agricultural specie combining. This genetic modification is different than laboratory GMO gene splicing. Nevertheless, the amount of 21st century agricultural genetic modification has been modified beyond  the human digestive system’s ability to adapt.

The bottom-line  is that even if you are not suffering from celiac disease or  have a gluten sensitivity, you still could be suffering from the ill effects of wheat and other grains. Even organic whole wheat has a high glycemic index (GI), which over time may increase your glycemic load and create diabetes II.

So although whole wheat grains are considered complex carbohydrates, modern day wheat contains amylopectin A, which is a rapidly absorbed carbohydrate that spikes your blood sugar. The other grains that can contribute to the spike in blood sugar  include: Barley, rye, triticale (a cross between wheat and rye), bulgur, farina, kamut, seminola, durum flour, and spelt.

There are better grain options, however. Buckwheat, which is not actually wheat, amaranth, rice, hominy, sorghum, tapioca, arrowroot, quinoa, and einkorn are okay. Uncommon einkorn is the ancient traditional wheat our ancestors enjoyed. Oats are controversial. Some argue that oats are contaminated by wheat.

The downside of wheat and some other grains

Beer belly is actually wheat or grain belly, according to Body Ecology. It is visceral fat, or fat that has accumulated around body cavity organs, such as the liver, stomach, or intestines. Subcutaneous fat is just under the skin. It is the flabby, flesh of any part of your body.

Obese folks have both visceral and subcutaneous fat issues. A beer or wheat belly most likely indicates visceral fat. In addition to the obvious potential of diabetes II from obesity, there is another ominous aspect of visceral fat.

Visceral fat acts as a gland, secreting hormones that make the immune system react. This produces more fat to store and protect pathogens from invading our organs. It’s the proverbial vicious cycle, and it also produces low level chronic inflammation that can result in various autoimmune diseases.

Cardiologist William Davis, MD, warns against the gluten free diet for losing a wheat belly. The wheat substitutes such as potato flour have high glycemic index issues also, and they can increase your GI load to cause the obesity you’re trying to avoid.

Five wheat belly indicators in addition to a bloated belly

1) High blood sugar
2) Skin problems, rashes, acne, and eczema
3) Bouts of anxiety and depression – low energy
4) Gut disorders – yeast infections
5) Early aging disorders that include dementia

Beyond this lies celiac disease, which can be determined by a blood test and/or gut biopsy.

Sprouted grain bread options

Weston A. Price Foundation founders Sally Fallon and Mary G. Enig, PhD, researched sprouted grains and determined they had a lower GI than grains not sprouted.

The sprouts still contain some gluten, but sprouted grain enzymes break down a good deal of the grains’ normally harmful ingredients. They are more nutritious than merely whole grains.

There are the Ezekiel sprouted grain breads. Some bakeries make sprouted wheat and other sprouted grain breads. Whole Food bakeries provide a sourdough, sprouted wheat bread without bromide, a harmful ingredient used by most bakeries.

You might be able to get away with some of the options mentioned in this article instead of being forced into a strict Paleolithic (Paleo) or hunter/gatherer diet to avoid wheat belly.

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